Strings

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This topic contains 49 replies, has 30 voices, and was last updated by  wwittonnuil 6 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #88

    Strahinja Petrovic
    Participant

    What kind of strings do you use?
    At first i was using cheap noname steels from a year maybe, then I bought Rotosound strings and used them with k&k but I was unhappy with them because the tension on E and A string was very different from tension on D and G and E and A were also a lot thinner… I am now happy with Tomastik Supreflexibles Solo…

    #95

    thomas
    Participant

    i agree- unbalanced sets of strings do suck and im generally too lazy to go on a mix and match quest…i really like superflexi mediums- especially cause they dont have the cheese slicer G and i just find em more robust sounding..
    i just strung up a set of evah pirazzi i was holding for a bass that im ‘restoring’ tho and holy shit..i just played the things for about 3 hours straight and 100% impressed.
    ill keep you posted as to how they break in and how they stand up to slapping.

    #100

    Dan Enriquez
    Participant

    Labella Supernils! They work for me. They don’t break. I like the tension and the response they have.

    Been using them pretty much when I started bass 15 years ago. Haven’t really experimented with many different strings. I hate changing them. I’d rather do something else with my time.

    #108

    markus
    Participant

    why do i get this feeling,there will be the same ppl and discussions from the rabbass.com :D,

    anyway,on one bass i am using rotosounds, on other superflexibles

    #113

    Carlos Cordero
    Participant

    Supernils on the Eberle, Silver Slaps on the Carruthers.

    #114

    Gut strings are what belongs on a double bass. 😉 Steels are for slabs!

    Haha, this is gonna be like RABbass! :laugh:

    I say play what you wanna play. It ain’t the strings, it’s the playin that counts. 😉

    #119

    Shawn Burrell
    Participant

    One of my favorite topics! All Gut!

    #126

    This seems to be a very touchy subject…

    I play Thomastik Spirocores for almost 20 years. In general I prefer steel strings mostly because of the intonation. Guts usually go out of tune pretty often and are very sensitive to the weather (specially if you’re in a touring band). Steels are a little bit harder on the hands, but after few years of regular practicing, it shouldn’t be so hard. I also found that I have the best balance between playing arco, pizz and slap with Thomastiks. I prefer a little bit higher tension and action than regular, because it brings a little extra punch to the sound.

    I never understood why is such a big deal about what kind of strings people use. By my opinion, different string companies just use players’ names to advertise their products. They usually don’t care about those players and their music. I think that good player will always have a good sound, no matter what strings, instrument, amp and pickup he uses.

    There were so many examples in the history of amazing gut (Willie Dixon) and steel players (Milt Hinton). Milt Hinton sounded great on guts ([i]Pluckin the Bass[/i] period) and steels (everything after 1950’s). Kevin Smith sounds great on guts (with High Noon) and steels (with Dwight Yoakam).

    Even now, there are really great players on any type of strings: guts (Jimmy Sutton), steel (Roland Guerin), weedwackers (Jake Erwin) and many others.

    I strongly believe that the sound is in the fingers and the heart, not in the gear.

    #127

    Kevin Smith
    Participant

    I agree that most of the tone is in the hands! The more time you spend with a certain set up, the more comfortable you get and you learn how to get the sound you strive for out of the instrument and equipment(amp, strings,preamps ,mics, etc…).
    I keep one bass set up with steel(Thomastics are great on every level)and I use this bass for gigs where intonation and sustain is important, and one bass set up with gut(goldentone D and G and Pirastro Eudoxa A and E) where the rhythm and warmth is the primary function of the bass. I love being able to have access to both…
    KS

    [b]bullfiddlecat wrote:[/b]
    [quote]This seems to be a very touchy subject…

    I play Thomastik Spirocores for almost 20 years. In general I prefer steel strings mostly because of the intonation. Guts usually go out of tune pretty often and are very sensitive to the weather (specially if you’re in a touring band). Steels are a little bit harder on the hands, but after few years of regular practicing, it shouldn’t be so hard. I also found that I have the best balance between playing arco, pizz and slap with Thomastiks. I prefer a little bit higher tension and action than regular, because it brings a little extra punch to the sound.

    I never understood why is such a big deal about what kind of strings people use. By my opinion, different string companies just use players’ names to advertise their products. They usually don’t care about those players and their music. I think that good player will always have a good sound, no matter what strings, instrument, amp and pickup he uses.

    There were so many examples in the history of amazing gut (Willie Dixon) and steel players (Milt Hinton). Milt Hinton sounded great on guts ([i]Pluckin the Bass[/i] period) and steels (everything after 1950’s). Kevin Smith sounds great on guts (with High Noon) and steels (with Dwight Yoakam).

    Even now, there are really great players on any type of strings: guts (Jimmy Sutton), steel (Roland Guerin), weedwackers (Jake Erwin) and many others.

    I strongly believe that the sound is in the fingers and the heart, not in the gear.[/quote]

    #130

    Patrik Backlund
    Participant

    I use D’Addario Helicore, Solo series. I have always liked steels more than guts or nylons, I like the higher tension. It would be great to have a bass with guts too, but I only have one bass.

    I also agree that most of the tone is in the hands. I think it’s the same thing with every string instrument.

    #132

    Dan Enriquez
    Participant

    agree with the tone coming from the hands and the way you attack your instrument. A good setup also helps. I would have to say the hands is about 90% of your tone.

    #138

    misfit_nl
    Participant

    I started using weedwhackers, moved on the rotosounds and now I’m playing Silver Slaps.

    But i guess for me it will be a never ending story for the search for the right strings…

    Haven’t tried gut strings because they are to expensive, I would like to try gut strings.

    #148

    Kevin Stewart
    Participant

    Definitely … Tone is in the hands of the player. But, strings add the character to the tone.

    Guts are what I choose to play. I love the tone I get from them. I love the tone they get on recordings too.

    I have a bass that is strung up with Steels. (thanks Djordje) Started out playing steels, but ripped my fingers to shreds one too many times… now that my technique has completely changed, I can handle steels for hours. But, for some reason, guts still sound best to me. That’s why I use them.

    For someone to find their perfect string choice, I think it’s important to listen to your influences and find out what string they play. Once you have that set of strings on your bass, play them for at least 3-6 months before changing your mind.

    Like all of the good players have said… it takes time to play and get comfortable and develop your style and technique. You can’t do that with a new set of strings in a week or two.

    #157

    Rob Oxoby
    Participant

    I think its all in the player as to what kind of tone and intonation develop. I was using Spirocores, with some occasional experimentation with Hellicores (which I didn’t like) and weed whackers (which didn’t work for all the things I wanted to do). I do a fair amount of bowing so I’ve been sticking with steels. That said, I started using Pirastro’s Evah Pirazzi strings. These things are excellent (for me). If you have a chance to try a set of these give them a run. Great tone and an awesome feel. I was surprised by how well and rich they sounded when slapping.

    #180

    chris
    Participant

    First i played unknown steel strings that some web page identificated it as thomastik precission orchestra. Fingerkiller but not so bad. I only changed G for weedwacker, cause original one was a razor.

    Now i play Presto (eurosonic) Lights, and i really dont know why people dont like them. After few days strings are soft for hands ( first time you play on new prestos isnt nice) sound cool, thick and what is important for me, they dont loose sound when slap amplified. This thomastik stuff that i played tend to loose volume when you changed from pizz to slap. Anyway G is still weedwacker.

    I would like to try guts but they’re too expensive and in place where we play there is almost same temperature as outdoors, but no wind 😀 in winter if outdoors -15, inside -5. Summer +30 outdoors, inside +25 😉

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